Oracle patch prerequisite check OPatch OEM MOS

January 19, 2016 by Leave a comment 

Oracle database patching is one of the most frequently executed maintenance activities that every DBA does in his life. The task is fairly simple and straight forward using the patch instructions from My Oracle Support (MOS). However in this article I’d like to highlight the importance of different Patch Prerequisite Checks that you have to perform before doing the patching itself. I think the entire success of patching exercise depends mostly on this step as seen on the below table that represents major PSU patching steps and approximate time lines. The rest of this draft document describes some best practices, tips and code examples for doing patch prerequisite checks using OEM Cloud Control, MOS and OPatch utility. Comments, adjustments, other tips and ideas are welcome and will be included in this post.

Oracle DB PSU patching steps

Oracle database PSU patching steps

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Column-Oriented Databases vs RDBMS and Oracle

May 30, 2014 by Leave a comment 

This is the second part of my article about Column-Store databases. In the first part Column-Oriented Databases – Old Idea, New wave I was focusing on topics like performance and functionality of Column-Oriented Databases and their comparison to RDBMS, specifically to Oracle database. This time I will continue the comparison of two database camps – Column-Stores vs Row-Stores – in areas of compression, partitioning. I’ll mention also the usage of Column-oriented storage benefits in Oracle products, like for example a new Oracle 12c database In-Memory Option.

Compression of columns vs rows

One of the potential advantages of column-oriented storage is the possibility of good compression. It is important to understand why compressing the data can be advantageous. It is not primarily the pure cost of having enough disk space to cover the physical size of the data that matters – disks are relatively cheap and are getting larger and cheaper at a steady rate. Rather, the potential benefit is when data has to be retrieved from disk as part of processing queries. Good I/O bandwidth is not cheap and techniques, such as compression, that reduce the size of the data that is retrieved from storage can be very advantageous, although there is usually some CPU-cost associated with compressing and uncompressing the data.

Oracle for example provides several major mechanisms for utilizing compression to benefit query processing. One is the row-level objects compression feature; another is Exadata Hybrid Columnar Compression – HCC (see below).

Partitioning VERTICAL vs HORIZONTAL

Column-oriented storage is a form of vertical partitioning of the data. One of the disadvantages of this type of partitioning is Read more »

Column-Oriented Databases – Old Idea, New wave

May 23, 2014 by Leave a comment 

During the last few years I went through several POC of different Column-Store databases reviewing their functionality, performance and use cases. Usually at the beginning of every exercise I saw the impressive vendor promises of reach functionality, great performance and scalability. Some even said: this is a new trend in database world, even a standard! You do not need RDBMS anymore!
In this type of cases I usually act as conservative database architect. And you know what – that always helped eliminating additional companies’ efforts and frustrations in implementing specialized database solutions. This time I share some experiences in evaluating Column-Store databases. But let start with basics first.

While most commercial RDBMS products store data in some form of row format, some database vendors provide column-oriented storage of data. The supposed advantages of storing the data by column rather than by row include a better ability to compress the data, something that would reduce the need for disk-I/O. The idea of column-based storage is not new and has been used in commercial products from former Sybase and Sand Technology for well over a decade. In reality, each storage format has its own set of advantages and disadvantages and there is no free lunch – only tradeoffs.

The tradeoffs associated with column-based storage include the cost of tracking and eventual reconstruction of the rows to which the column values belong as well as additional complexity for ETL and OLTP processing. While recognizing that each storage format has its pros and cons and that there are scenarios where a column-based format has some merit, it is worth examining whether the column-based format lives up to its recent hype.

Beware of disingenuous benchmark numbers

Yes folks – PERFORMANCE is the main sales factor of the columnar databases!
There are claims that Column-Stores outperform a commercial row-store RDBMS by large factors. I just want to warn you to not rely blindly on magic performance benchmarks the vendors have done, in house themselves. Usually these performance test cases are not similar to the real production database loads, created often for read-only data using database engines that lacks RDBMS features and functionality that would be required in a production system.

A second observation is that the often benchmarks against Column-Stores do not test joins. Read more »

Oracle 12c Pluggable Database feature insights

January 25, 2013 by 6 Comments 

I’m excited about a new version of Oracle database 12c that will be released soon. In the last article I wrote about a considerable architectural change that Oracle is going to introduce with help of Oracle 12c Pluggable database feature. Let’s continue and explore some details of Oracle 12c Pluggable database feature.

Bear in mind that conventional database mode will be still available in 12c database. That means you will have two options of creating a usual old-fashioned Oracle database (non-CDB) or creating a Container Database (CDB) that will hold all your Pluggable Databases (PDB) that you will create or plug later. See below more details.

12c Pluggable Database details

– Each PDB has its own private data dictionary for customer-created database objects; CDB on the other hand as a whole has the data dictionary for the Oracle-supplied system each data dictionary defines its own namespace. In other words, there is global Data dictionary (CDB level) and local one (PDB level).

– There is a new split data dictionary architecture that allows a PDB to be quickly unplugged from one CDB and plugged into a different CDB

– Each PDB sees a read-only definition of the Oracle-supplied system

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Database Performance Tuning Questionnaire

October 27, 2010 by 1 Comment 

Performance problems occur when a task takes longer to perform than the time allowed and uses excessive resources. If the database seems to be running very slow or a command seems to take a long time to respond, an experienced DBA can try to diagnose this runtime problem and fix it.

Performance tuning is a complex process requiring collaborative efforts from DBA and Application team. Thus, to make the tuning exercise efficient and minimize the effort required, the performance issues should be clearly defined. The more precise and detailed you can answer below questions, the easier and faster the tuning process will be for a DBA. Read more »

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